MAMA News

No Classes Labor Day Weekend

There are no scheduled classes after this Friday’s Happy Hour Roll through Monday (Labor Day)

Class will resume Tuesday, Sept 2nd.

Have a safe and happy Labor Day weekend!!

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Millard Days Parade

MAMA will be walking in the Millard Days Parade again this year.  All students, families and friends are welcome to participate.  We will be handing out candy and water bottles to the kids along the parade route….always fun.

We are spot #52 located on Old L street across from Sam’s Club.  Suggest parking in Sam’s or Walmart and then walking over.

Parade starts at 11:00.

Please wear a MAMA shirt if you can.

Hope to see lots of faces out there!!

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Open Roll with Lincoln BJJ

Saturday, July 26th
12:00-2:00

MAMA is hosting joint rolling session with our fellow BJJ practitioners from Lincoln BJJ. Like our last “smoker” in Omaha it will provide a chance to take part in ‘competition style’ matches that will be refereed and scored. Again, this is not a tournament, and there will be no medals or divisions.

In addition to the refereed matches, there will be open rolling on the sides of the mat. Students are welcome to participate in matches, or just roll, open mat style, on their own.

Whichever you choose to do, this will be a great chance to meet some fellow Nebraska BJJ players and to train with new partners.

Omaha students are highly encouraged to support the event. Coaches Jerry, Kyle, and Matt will be headed down. Van departs Omaha at 10:30.

Lunch and fellowship immediately after.

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Workout Nutrition Illustrated

 By John Berardi

berardi, nutrition, fitness

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Perspective on Getting a Black Belt

A little perspective on achieving a black belt: Consider Malcolm Gladwell’s 10,000 hours theory. He contends that 10,000 hours of dedicated practice in a given field or area of expertise allows a person to truly become an “expert”.

Assuming we consider a black belt an expert in that particular art, at a standard 40 hour work week it would take a person 5 years to become a black belt…IF all those hours are truly dedicated to the practice/study/train of that art.

How many of us practice 40 hours each week? How many do so for even 20 hours each and every week? Think about it…20 hours is 4 hours per day Mon-Fri for 50 weeks every year for 10 years!

How long did it take to get your black belt?

Have you put the time in to consider yourself an expert?

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Sparring in America

kevin ross, muay thai

Sparring in America

by Kevin Ross

Recently I was sent a quote by Saenchai,

“When it comes to technique, work on it over and over again until you have mastered it. The most important thing for me is technical sparring, I always tried to do as much as possible throughout my career and think it should be the most important part of any ones training. You should try and spar with as many people as you can, spar in a controlled manner so you are learning not just using brute strength. When you get to a good level always look for fighters better than you to work with and learn from.”

This got me thinking of the different levels, as well as styles, of sparring I have experienced throughout the years, from technical to straight out fight sparring.

kevin ross, jpw, muay thai

Training with JWP

Sparring in general can be a great thing that can greatly improve your overall gams as long as it’s done correctly. On the other hand when you don’t have the right people to work with it can counter productive as well as lead to unnecessary injuries. What I’ve noticed sparring here in the states as opposed to what I’ve experienced in Thailand, for the most part, is that people here spar as if they are fighting whereas in Thailand it is more about improveing technique and timing. I think there’s a few reason’s for this. One; in general a lot of ‘fighters’(in America), or people that train, seem to feel the need to prove something, ego’s get involved and a simple sparring match quickly escalates into a fight. Also there are way to many peole that don’t really fight, they just train, and the gym is their proving ground. These types of people are usually refered to as gym warriors. People that like to beat on weaker students but will never have what it takes to actually get in the ring and test themselves. Another reason I feel there is a lack of technical sparring is that not a lot people here in America have good technique, in general. It’s hard to have a good technical sparring session when you are the only one with proper technique and the person you are working with is seems to be emulating what they saw in the last toughman tournament.

kevin ross, stephan bonner,muay thaiSparring with Stephen Bonnar

A lot of gyms here in the states, ,most these days, are a lot more greated toward MMA. You have all these guys, most of which came from wrestling or Jiu Jitsu, who are just now picking up the stand up game. Just like anything in fighting, it takes two, you need to have good training partners in order to get better. If you are the best in the gym it can be really hard to improve unless you really know how to work on specific things even without the help of better fighters. I deffinitley think that there is a time and place for full on, fight-like sparring. The problem is that a lot of these gyms make this a daily practice as opposed to a once a while kind of thing. I deffinitley think you should know what it’s like to take a hard shot, get rocked, know how to stay composed and continue fighting and the last place you wan’t to figure this out is in an actual fight. Hard sparring is the closest thing you can come to this without actual getting in the ring and finding out first hand.

kevin ross, Sittichai, muay thaiClinching with Sittichai

Now I’m the type of person that loves to get hit and loves hard sparring, especially when I first started. I love getting in there mixing it up, getting hit, and testing myself. But just like anything else you need to have balance. When I first started I sparred all the time and it was always full on, luckily I had other good technical guys to work with so it wasn’t just a brawl and I wasn’t getting too many unnessacary injuries. Finally after about 5 years I made it to Thailand for the first time. I was surprised at how little they actual sparred and when they did it was either technical sparring with no pads or it was boxing sparring where would would go almost full speed. I went in to that fight feeling pretty awkward cause I usually gadge how good of shape I am in by how I feel sparring. I almost felt off but I knew these were the best fighters in the world so they must be doing something right. At the same time it was probably the healthiest I had ever gone into a fight because I didn’t have any stupid injuries that you normally get from going too hard. So I’ve seen these two extremes, from full out sparring everyday to almost no hard sparring at all, only technique. I’d have to say that from me, personally the best answer is a balance of the two. I definitely think it’s good to go all out once in a while because it gives you the closest look at how an actual fight is going to be. But I do feel like there should be a lot more technical work if we as American fighters ever plan on competing at the higher levels.

l_5d224d7535e2800dcbd61c825f6d33d7working with Chaz

Now days I try and save the full out sparring for the end of the week, usually saturdays. During the week I stick to a much more technical approach, granted there are days when I do pick it up a bit but I feel that my level improves drastically when I have to be more technical rather than relying on power. The other good thing about technical sparring is that you can do it with whoever, regardless of weight difference, granted they are technically good as well.Obviously everyone is different and for some, sparring hard every single day will work for them. I think you just need to find the right balance between the two but I guarantee you will see a lot more imporvement if you slow things down a bit and really work on the technical aspect of the game.

What kind of sparring goes on at your gym or what have you noticed works best for you?

kevin ross, muay thaiKevin Ross
I was born in Reading, PA July 27th 1980 and spent the majority of my youth criss-crossing all over the United States. From Pennsylvania to New York, Georgia, Oregon, Colorado and then finally, in the summer of 94′, ending up in Vegas, where I have been ever since. I spent my teenage years not doing much other than partying day in and day out. I was already a full blown alcoholic by the time I turned 21. Luckily I came across Muay Thai when I was 16, seeing it on ESPN, although it did take me another 7 years to actually get started. I got into Muay Thai for one purpose, to be the best fighter that I could be. I gave up drinking two days before I stepped foot into the gym and never looked back, the rest is history.

 

Link to Article

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July 4th Holiday Schedule

Modified schedule during the 4th of July holiday weekend.

July 4th
Fight Fit 6:00
BJJ 11:30
Muay Thai 12:30

July 5th
NO CLASSES

July 6th
NO CLASSES

Thanks! Have a fun and safe holiday weekend!!

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Longest Day June 21st

 

alzheimers, longest day, martial arts,

Mid-America Martial Arts proudly supports the efforts of the Midland’s Chapter
Alzheimer’s Association.

On Saturday June 21st, the year’s longest day, MAMA will be open from sunrise to sunset to help raise awareness of the chapter’s extraordinary efforts.

Classes are FREE to all family and friends!!

Schedule
5:30 Open Gym
8:30 Yoga
9:30 Judo
10:30 BJJ
11:30 BJJ Stripe Testing
12:30 Muay Thai
1:30 Muay Thai Testing
2:30 Women’s Self Defense Workshop
4:30 Happy Hour Roll / Open Gym

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Schedule Change (Omaha)

New lunchtime schedule starts in Omaha tomorrow.

Tuesday HIIT with Sasha and Thursday Yoga with Tera..both at 12:30 to round out our lunchtime offering with Muay Thai Mon, Wed & Thurs!

Kickboxing vs Muay Thai

Here is a pretty good read on the differences in various types of kickboxing.