Resilience in the Face of Adversity

Everyday Is Training Day

Resilience in the Face of Adversity

We are living in a very dynamic and interesting time. The threat of the coronavirus has put much of the country into a panic largely due to fear and the unknown. Rapid change is all around us as we figure out what courses of action are needed to deal with what appears to be a something of a pandemic proportion.

I am reminded of the idea of being resilient during this time; our ability to accept and adapt to change that is beyond our control. Fear mongering is pushing many to overreact and conduct themselves in manners that will likely not help them deal with something we are discovering in the real time anyway. Others are taking a slower, more measured approach of wait and see before acting in any particular direction.

Change management is a big buzz word in corporate America right now. As is the concept of mindfulness. Both are intimately related. Being aware of our tolerance for change. Understanding what makes us uncomfortable and when we begin to feel overwhelmed is incredibly important in all aspects of life. Taking a moment to sit and think about where we are mentally, physically and psychologically will help bring clarity to an otherwise chaotic period.

We must also not forget there are people all around us; often taking que from us. Children learn by imitating.  Guess what, so do our employees, students, mentees, interns and even peers.  Chaotic and erratic behavior begets itself. We must be leaders and examples of calm; not fear mongers.

Part of resilience is being prepared. I’m not talking about a prepper’s guide to Armageddon or the zombie apocalypse but preparing yourself physically and mentally for adversity. There is no question a better physical condition allows you to be more resilient when facing change and adverse conditions. People more physically fit can go longer without food, withstand temperature extremes and possess stronger immune systems more resistant to disease. Eat whole, fresh, nutrient dense foods and exercise daily and you will have a more resilient body. Those who practice martial arts have shown a propensity to be more mentally aware of their self and thereby more adaptable to change and chaos. Anyone who has ever sparred understands change and chaos!

I remember growing up with my formidable years being the 80s and the AIDS/HIV scare the country and the world had. People were convinced this was the one that would end us all. Nobody knew what is really was or how it was spread and assumed it was a death sentence if you contracted it. I see a lot of similarities today. The coronavirus scare will come and go. Our nation is a nation of strong and resilient people. We need to remind ourselves of that from time to time, especially now.

Everyday Is Training Day – Reap What You Sow